1976-Allen-Mantle-Martin-Dimaggio

1976-yankees

1976 Old Timers day. Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995), nicknamed “The Commerce Comet” or “The Mick”, was an American professional baseball player. He was a Major League Baseball (MLB) centerfielder and first baseman for the New York Yankees for 18 seasons, from 1951 through 1968. Mantle is regarded by many to be the greatest switch hitter of all time,[1] and one of the greatest players in baseball history. Mantle was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974 [2] and was elected to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team in 1999.

Mantle was noted for his ability to hit for both average and power,[3] especially tape-measure home runs.[4] He won the Triple Crown in 1956, leading MLB in batting average, home runs, and runs batted in (RBI).[5] He was an American League (AL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) three times and All-Star sixteen times, playing in 19 of the 20 All-Star games he was named to. Mantle appeared in 12 World Series, his team winning 7 of them. He holds the records for most World Series home runs (18), RBIs (40), runs (42), walks (43), extra-base hits (26), and total bases (123).[6] He is also the career leader (tied with Jim Thome) in walk-off home runs, with a combined thirteen, twelve in the regular season and one in the postseason.

Alfred Manuel “Billy” Martin, Jr. (May 16, 1928 – December 25, 1989) was an American Major League Baseball second baseman and manager. He is best known as the manager of the New York Yankees, a position he held five different times. As Yankees manager, he led the team to consecutive American League pennants in 1976 and 1977; the Yankees were swept in the 1976 World Series by the Cincinnati Reds but triumphed over the Los Angeles Dodgers in six games in the 1977 World Series. He also had notable managerial tenures with several other AL squads, leading four of them to division championships.

As a manager, Martin was known for turning losing teams into winners, and for arguing animatedly with umpires, including a widely parodied routine in which he kicked dust on their feet. However, he was criticized for not getting along with veteran players and owners, burning out young pitchers, and for having an addiction to alcohol. During the 1969 through 1988 period as a manager, Martin totaled 1,253 victories with a .553 winning percentage.

Joseph Paul “Joe” DiMaggio (/dɨˈmɑːʒioʊ/ or /dɨˈmædʒioʊ/; November 25, 1914 – March 8, 1999), born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, nicknamed “Joltin’ Joe” and “The Yankee Clipper”, was an Italian- American Major League Baseball center fielder who played his entire 13-year career for the New York Yankees. He is perhaps best known for his 56-game hitting streak (May 15 – July 16, 1941), a record that still stands.[1]

DiMaggio was a three-time MVP winner and an All-Star in each of his 13 seasons. During his tenure with the Yankees, the club won ten American League pennants and nine World Series championships.

At the time of his retirement, he ranked fifth in career home runs (361) and sixth in career slugging percentage (.579). He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1955, and was voted the sport’s greatest living player in a poll taken during the baseball centennial year of 1969.[2]

His brothers Vince and Dom also became major league center fielders.

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