1977-4-Catchers-Munson–Howard-Berra-&-Dickey

1977 yankees

New York Yankees 4 catchers 1977 William Malcolm Dickey (June 6, 1907 – November 12, 1993) was a professional baseball catcher and manager. He played in Major League Baseball for the New York Yankees for 19 seasons. Dickey managed the Yankees after retiring from his playing career.

Dickey played for the Yankees from 1928 through 1943. After serving in the United States Navy during World War II, Dickey returned to the Yankees in 1946 as a player and manager. He retired after the 1946 season, but returned in 1949 as a coach, where he taught Yogi Berra the art of catching.

During Dickey’s playing career, the Yankees went to the World Series nine times, winning eight championships. He was named to 11 All-Star Games. As a manager and coach, the Yankees won another six World Series titles. Dickey was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1954.

Lawrence Peter “Yogi” Berra (born May 12, 1925) is an American former Major League Baseball catcher, outfielder, and manager. He played almost his entire 19-year baseball career (1946–1965) for the New York Yankees. Berra is one of only four players to be named the Most Valuable Player of the American League three times and is one of seven managers to lead both American and National League teams to the World Series. As a player, coach, or manager, Berra appeared in 21 World Series. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1972.

Berra is widely regarded as one of the greatest catchers in baseball history. He was named to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team in a voting of fans in 1999. According to the win shares formula developed by sabermetrician Bill James, Berra is the greatest catcher of all time and the 52nd greatest non-pitching player in major-league history.

Berra, who quit school after the eighth grade,[1] was also known for his mangled quotes, such as “It ain’t over ’til it’s over”, while speaking to reporters. Simultaneously denying and confirming his reputation, Berra once stated, “I really didn’t say everything I said.”[2]

Elston Gene Howard (February 23, 1929 – December 14, 1980) was an American professional baseball catcher, left fielder and coach. During a 14-year baseball career, he played in the Negro Leagues and Major League Baseball from 1948 through 1968, primarily for the New York Yankees. He also played for the Kansas City Monarchs and the Boston Red Sox.

The first African American player on the Yankees roster,[1][2] he was named the American League’s Most Valuable Player for the 1963 pennant winners after finishing third in the league in slugging average and fifth in home runs, becoming the first black player in AL history to win the honor. He won Gold Glove Awards in 1963 and 1964, in the latter season setting AL records for putouts and total chances in a season. His lifetime fielding percentage of .993 was a major league record from 1967 to 1973, and he retired among the AL career leaders in putouts (7th, 6,447) and total chances (9th, 6,977).

One of the most regular World Series participants in history, he appeared in ten of them, winning six, and ranks among Series career leaders in several categories. His lifetime slugging average of .427 ranked fourth among AL catchers at the time of his retirement.

Thurman Lee Munson (June 7, 1947 – August 2, 1979) was an American Major League Baseball catcher. He played his entire 11-year professional baseball career for the New York Yankees (1969–1979). A perennial All-Star, Munson is the only Yankee to win both the Rookie of the Year and Most Valuable Player awards.

Born in Akron, Ohio, Munson was selected as the fourth pick of the 1968 Major League Baseball Draft. Munson hit over .300 in his two seasons in the Minor Leagues, establishing himself as a top prospect. He became the New York Yankees’ starting catcher late in the 1969 season. Munson played his first complete season in 1970, and was voted A.L. Rookie of the Year after hitting .302.

Considered the “heart and soul” of the Yankees, Munson was named the first team captain since Lou Gehrig. He led the Yankees to three consecutive World Series appearances from 1976 to 1978, and two consecutive World Series championships from 1977 to 1978.

Munson died at age 32 while practicing landing his Cessna Citation at Akron-Canton Airport. Munson suffered a broken neck as result of the crash, and his cause of death was asphyxiation. His two companions escaped the burned aircraft.

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